OpenStreetMap

I had been in this area, then run to lower elevations for a storm, then back for some trails I still wanted to do.

Work for mapping began with Hope Lake, where someone had managed to number the trail, but not name it. After the lake, they’d just marked it with a fixme. Yes, it’s the same trail. Then I got to playing with things over the hill and there was more of this very minimal editing to improve. Then I ran into the Colorado Trail. Um. The Colorado Trail is a mess, frankly. Someone decided it should all be named “Colorado Trail (Segment #)”. This is an area where the trail runs along older named trails. The Forest Service went hyphenating the name onto the old name on their maps to keep them both on the map, but it is two different names. Someone had copied it over, including keeping the Colorado Trail on a differently named trail after the Colorado had left it. And then I started running into the segment numbers. Why? Why why why? That’s a whole project in itself.

So I quit that and moved on. I thought about doing the Sheep Mountain trail, which may be informal but is well maintained including an astonishing amount of logging out the old road it follows. Unfortunately, I only joined it halfway along on my way down. I didn’t like the look of the mountain where it goes and took on some easy, if steep, mountain instead. The log at the top indicates Teluride is up here all the time in the summer. I dithered and ultimately did add what I could. There are complete tracks on Peakbagger, so I could potentially add all of it depending on the license there.

I was surprised about Lizard Head Trail in that it wasn’t even named. Also the bathroom was at the wrong end of the lot. And there’s a half dozen information signs in the area. I went adding a whole session of stuff before uploading and starting in on the trail itself. I added a short spur trail on the way up Black Face as well as the high pools. Some of its route probably isn’t that good, but the trail is visible at the end of official trail, so it’s probably easy to follow on the ground. Up and over, I added in trail_visiblity since it suffers a little once at the top. Names and numbers all filled in. No bikes in the wilderness set. Cross Mountain was fine as trail, but the trailhead needed a lot of work. There’s a trail and bridge and it was fording the creek instead. The FS claims that little road is called Lizard Head, so it is. Someone has marked the trail along the buried power lines since I got my map downloaded. I’d had to just guess I could do that. (Lizard Head’s start had been sorted, too. Decades ago, it had a very different start. There’s been work done up here. It was much better already than what I’d had on hand from OSM.)

I even found something to do along the way to the trestle bridge. The FS is assuring me that all these roads, the one out to the corral too, are called Trestle until they become North Trout Lake at some indeterminate location. Except the loop for parking at the end of Galloping Goose, which is Trestle A. Then I decided that Galloping Goose needed a relation to show where it is. Then I found out that none of the trail sections of Galloping Goose have been mapped. It doesn’t follow the marked railroad route. I can’t see the trail in a lot of places. The Strava heat map indicates the trail actually does a few things very different from what the FS says. Of course, that’s not labeled so maybe it’s something else people have been following. Since I didn’t hike this, I decided now to do it after all.

Location: San Miguel County, Colorado, United States

Login to leave a comment