OpenStreetMap

Tom Layo's diary

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Coursera Map course

Posted by Tom Layo on 1 March 2013 in English (English)

Coursera offers a free online course called Maps and the Geospacial Revolution here: https://www.coursera.org/course/maps

It starts July 17, 2013 for 5 weeks. From Penn State U.

Science Humor in OSM

Posted by Tom Layo on 1 July 2012 in English (English)

I noticed this tag on a particle accelerator and it cracked me up, because it's right. tag

Location: 1147, Ban Doi Yao, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

US Map

Posted by Tom Layo on 21 June 2012 in English (English)

Many roads in the US are badly misaligned. I pick towns that have crooked streets and align them to Bing imagery. A follow up comparison with Transparent Map shows that the imagery is reliable. I think that an online list of all US towns that could be checked off after alignment might make this a more organized process. There could also be a 'random town' option if one did not know where to start.

Location: 1147, Ban Doi Yao, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

TIGER

Posted by Tom Layo on 30 May 2011 in English (English)

It's been too hot and rainy here in Thailand for extensive bicycle mapping, so I've been trying to clean up TIGER data from the US. It seems to be a mess in many areas (and just great where users are active).

I've spent most of a month or so aligning OSM roads in small to medium sized cities in the US. My criteria is just that the city has few or no other users or GPX traces, and is a mess. I just align them to Bing, and the results by comparing in Transparent Map are nearly perfect (The errors seem to be mine, and Google Map has similar inconsistencies).

Because of the random and careless placement of nodes, many of these areas had not a single navigable road depicted on OSM. Often I have to count from a landmark to correctly place them. First, I thought this must be vandalism, but no, it was TIGER. The topology seems fairly reliable tho, once you find a starting point.

This is an embarrassment to OSM, but not so hard to fix (Just tedious). There is some worry on blogs about the quality of the aerial images available to OSM. My experience suggests that what ever the image quality (and I've found nothing wrong), it is dramatically better than what is on the map now.

I think this is an important and time sensitive issue. One GPS manufacturer offers an OSM based unit. If they sell any in much of the US, the customers will never use OSM again. Portland, Oregon has adopted OSM for their transit planner website. This is a major city risking a major plan on the Map. If it works, other cash-strapped cities may follow.

Summary: The Map can be hugely improved without waiting for individual users to bike or drive every road. Most of the cities I've worked on have had no traces or edits in the history of the project. In short, use the largely correct TIGER data for street names and topology, and Bing for alignment.

Wish List: A way to offer tiles to volunteers to clean up, so the work could progress in an organized manner.

While I've done a bunch of edits, they are mostly the same things over and over. I don't know the intricacies of OSM and am probably missing much. Any constructive criticism appreciated.

Sincerely, Tom

OSM Meeting Chiang Mai

Posted by Tom Layo on 27 March 2011 in English (English)

The first (annual?) Thailand users meeting was on 26 March in Chiang Mai. As a computer lightweight and basic drone in this project, I was in awe of the grey matter the other participants use to keep it going.

So thanks to all! It was a pleasure to meet you and yours, and the bits I understood will help me make better maps.

Cheers, Tom Layo

Adding Chinese names

Posted by Tom Layo on 31 December 2010 in English (English)

..Is not hard, if you have an English sign. Input editor here http://www.chinese-tools.com/tools/ime.html will give you characters to chose from. Copy to clipboard, add street, road etc from dictionary, and copy to OSM.

Cheers, Sam

Location: Haiduan, 台東縣 (Táidōng), 957, Taiwan
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