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Data results for Parished/Unparished Areas

Posted by alexkemp on 24 August 2016 in English (English)

A recent Diary entry (A Suggestion to Fix Poor LSN in the UK) contained the phrase “Why those facilities fail for a substantial part (40%) of the UK”, and I promised to publish the raw data that led to the ‘40%’ claim. This is the fulfilment of that promise and be warned, it is long & intensely computer geeky.

In brief, that earlier Diary entry said:

  1. Location, Search & Naming facilities (LSN) require the presence of an “admin_level=10” (civil parish) area in the UK
  2. 40% of the UK does not have such an area, as it is unparished
  3. (thoughts on how to fix it)

The above both is, and is not, true (real life is usually a bit more complicated than that) but it was the best that I could manage & wanted to get the debate kicked off. In addition, some later spreadsheet-work (see bottom) indicates that it is more like 60% for the nations' cities, and 100% for all the major conurbations. Now for the methodology of acquiring, plus full results that led to, the 40% claim...

A site maintained by The Maarssen Mapper contains a page of all UK Civil Parishes in the form of GPX file downloads. The top of each file has an XML header that looks like this (this one is Birchgrove_Community):—

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" standalone="yes"?>
<gpx version="1.1" creator="Colin Smale (colin.smale@xs4all.nl)" xmlns="http://www.topografix.com/GPX/1/1">
    <metadata>
        <name>parish_region.shp</name>
        <desc>Derived from Ordnance Survey OpenData BoundaryLine data. Contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right 2016</desc>
        <copyright author="Ordnance Survey">
            <year>2016</year>
            <license>http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/docs/licences/os-opendata-licence.pdf</license>
        </copyright>
        <time>21/03/2016</time>
    </metadata>
    <trk>
        <name>Birchgrove Community</name>
        <desc>Civil Parish or Community</desc>
        <number>8293</number>
        <extensions>
            <NAME>Birchgrove Community</NAME>
            <AREA_CODE>CPC</AREA_CODE>
            <DESCRIPTIO>Civil Parish or Community</DESCRIPTIO>
            <FILE_NAME>ABERTAWE_-_SWANSEA</FILE_NAME>
            <NUMBER>37</NUMBER>
            <NUMBER0>103</NUMBER0>
            <POLYGON_ID>53808</POLYGON_ID>
            <UNIT_ID>15978</UNIT_ID>
            <CODE>W04000561</CODE>
            <HECTARES>906.985</HECTARES>
            <AREA>0</AREA>
            <TYPE_CODE>AA</TYPE_CODE>
            <DESCRIPT0>CIVIL ADMINISTRATION AREA</DESCRIPT0>
            <TYPE_COD0 />
            <DESCRIPT1 />
        </extensions>

<HECTARES> is the important item in this header (the acreage of the area), although <FILE_NAME> is also used in the code below, as that helps group all the parishes by District, etc (“admin_level=8”).

Although this is a page of Civil Parishes, being Britain, there are also a large number of Unnamed Shapes. These are the Black Holes of the Boundary world, the Unparished Areas. Those files' Headers are similar in almost all respects to the ordinary CPs. Importantly for ourselves, they contain both <HECTARES> & <FILE_NAME>.

I created a directory called ‘cps’ which contained all CP files, and another called ‘cps_un’. All Unnamed Shapes were extracted from ‘/cps’ and placed into ‘/cps_un’. The awk command (below) is using a space as a word-splitter, so it is important that <FILE_NAME> does NOT contain any spaces. Naturally, some files did in both dirs. The following command was used to discover them, then the header edited:

egrep -li "<FILE_NAME>.*[ ]+" JOSM/parishes/cps_un/*

The final item is that xml_grep is installed under Debian/Ubuntu as part of the xml-twig-tools package.

The following command-line script was built (testing all the way) to show unit & combined acreage for both sets of files:—

xml_grep
     --text_only
     --root HECTARES
     --root FILE_NAME
     --wrap JOSM/parishes/cps/* |    
paste -d " "  - - |    
awk '
    { sum[$1] += $2; TOT += $2; NUM += 1 }
    END
    {
        AVG=TOT/NUM;
        for (k in sum) { printf("%s: %d\n", k, sum[k]) }
        printf("ZZ %d Parishes; Total area=%d hectares; Average/Parish=%d \n", NUM, TOT, AVG)
    }
' |    
sort

(I've broken it down into sections, but it was used as a single line)
(being able to easily construct the above is one of the values of Linux)

The identical command was used on both directories, changing only the dir reference in the command. Here are the results:

Unparished Areas

ABERDEEN_CITY: 20561
ABERDEENSHIRE: 633826
ANGUS: 220323
ARGYLL_AND_BUTE: 716377
BARNSLEY_DISTRICT_(B): 14452
BATH_AND_NORTH_EAST_SOMERSET: 2867
BEDFORD_(B): 2221
BIRMINGHAM_DISTRICT_(B): 20871
BLACKBURN_WITH_DARWEN_(B): 3536
BLACKPOOL_(B): 4315
BOLTON_DISTRICT_(B): 9908
BOURNEMOUTH_(B): 4664
BRADFORD_DISTRICT_(B): 10864
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE_COUNTY: 2376
BURY_DISTRICT_(B): 9946
CALDERDALE_DISTRICT_(B): 14078
CAMBRIDGESHIRE_COUNTY: 4069
CHESHIRE_WEST_AND_CHESTER_(B): 9849
CITY_OF_BRISTOL_(B): 23533
CITY_OF_DERBY_(B): 7803
CITY_OF_EDINBURGH: 27300
CITY_OF_KINGSTON_UPON_HULL_(B): 8149
CITY_OF_LEICESTER_(B): 7334
CITY_OF_NOTTINGHAM_(B): 7461
CITY_OF_PETERBOROUGH_(B): 6058
CITY_OF_PLYMOUTH_(B): 8436
CITY_OF_PORTSMOUTH_(B): 6014
CITY_OF_SOUTHAMPTON_(B): 5638
CITY_OF_STOKE-ON-TRENT_(B): 9344
CITY_OF_WOLVERHAMPTON_DISTRICT_(B): 6943
CLACKMANNANSHIRE: 16392
COUNTY_DURHAM: 14844
COVENTRY_DISTRICT_(B): 8237
CUMBRIA_COUNTY: 11067
DERBYSHIRE_COUNTY: 11746
DEVON_COUNTY: 5233
DONCASTER_DISTRICT_(B): 8063
DORSET_COUNTY: 5088
DUDLEY_DISTRICT_(B): 9795
DUMFRIES_AND_GALLOWAY: 667605
DUNDEE_CITY: 6222
EAST_AYRSHIRE: 127033
EAST_DUNBARTONSHIRE: 17449
EAST_LOTHIAN: 70093
EAST_RENFREWSHIRE: 17424
EAST_SUSSEX_COUNTY: 11007
ESSEX_COUNTY: 28556
FALKIRK: 31493
FIFE: 137392
GATESHEAD_DISTRICT_(B): 12119
GLASGOW_CITY: 17644
GLOUCESTERSHIRE_COUNTY: 5805
GREATER_LONDON_AUTHORITY: 159411
HALTON_(B): 5420
HAMPSHIRE_COUNTY: 27784
HARTLEPOOL_(B): 4406
HERTFORDSHIRE_COUNTY: 26090
HIGHLAND: 2647274
INVERCLYDE: 17360
KENT_COUNTY: 25693
KIRKLEES_DISTRICT_(B): 20445
KNOWSLEY_DISTRICT_(B): 4330
LANCASHIRE_COUNTY: 39605
LEEDS_DISTRICT_(B): 25164
LEICESTERSHIRE_COUNTY: 11324
LINCOLNSHIRE_COUNTY: 9667
LIVERPOOL_DISTRICT_(B): 13353
LUTON_(B): 4335
MANCHESTER_DISTRICT_(B): 10910
MEDWAY_(B): 8167
MIDDLESBROUGH_(B): 4331
MIDLOTHIAN: 35527
MORAY: 225707
NA_H-EILEANAN_AN_IAR: 326856
NEWCASTLE_UPON_TYNE_DISTRICT_(B): 7355
NORFOLK_COUNTY: 9561
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE_COUNTY: 11347
NORTH_AYRSHIRE: 90390
NORTH_EAST_LINCOLNSHIRE_(B): 4238
NORTH_LANARKSHIRE: 47222
NORTH_LINCOLNSHIRE_(B): 3373
NORTH_TYNESIDE_DISTRICT_(B): 8481
NORTH_YORKSHIRE_COUNTY: 4577
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE_COUNTY: 26690
OLDHAM_DISTRICT_(B): 5406
ORKNEY_ISLANDS: 108621
OXFORDSHIRE_COUNTY: 3760
PERTH_AND_KINROSS: 541890
POOLE_(B): 7471
READING_(B): 4039
REDCAR_AND_CLEVELAND_(B): 6648
RENFREWSHIRE: 26923
ROCHDALE_DISTRICT_(B): 15812
ROTHERHAM_DISTRICT_(B): 6662
SALFORD_DISTRICT_(B): 9719
SANDWELL_DISTRICT_(B): 8555
SCOTTISH_BORDERS: 474265
SEFTON_DISTRICT_(B): 12073
SHEFFIELD_DISTRICT_(B): 18461
SHETLAND_ISLANDS: 165661
SLOUGH_(B): 2535
SOLIHULL_DISTRICT_(B): 5515
SOMERSET_COUNTY: 1354
SOUTH_AYRSHIRE: 123471
SOUTHEND-ON-SEA_(B): 5972
SOUTH_GLOUCESTERSHIRE: 737
SOUTH_LANARKSHIRE: 177404
SOUTH_TYNESIDE_DISTRICT_(B): 6710
STAFFORDSHIRE_COUNTY: 10200
ST_HELENS_DISTRICT_(B): 6382
STIRLING: 225481
STOCKPORT_DISTRICT_(B): 12604
STOCKTON-ON-TEES_(B): 3132
SUFFOLK_COUNTY: 6305
SUNDERLAND_DISTRICT_(B): 11379
SURREY_COUNTY: 55290
SWINDON_(B): 3649
TAMESIDE_DISTRICT_(B): 9449
THE_CITY_OF_BRIGHTON_AND_HOVE_(B): 8107
THURROCK_(B): 18431
TORBAY_(B): 11313
TRAFFORD_DISTRICT_(B): 7652
WAKEFIELD_DISTRICT_(B): 11778
WALSALL_DISTRICT_(B): 10397
WARRINGTON_(B): 1898
WARWICKSHIRE_COUNTY: 10827
WEST_DUNBARTONSHIRE: 18277
WEST_LOTHIAN: 43158
WEST_SUSSEX_COUNTY: 10895
WIGAN_DISTRICT_(B): 17008
WINDSOR_AND_MAIDENHEAD_(B): 3697
WIRRAL_DISTRICT_(B): 25639
WORCESTERSHIRE_COUNTY: 8570
YORK_(B): 2836
ZZ 3069 Parishes; Total area=9229902 hectares; Average/Parish=3007

Civil Parishes:

ABERTAWE_-SWANSEA: 42089
BARNSLEY_DISTRICT
(B): 18454
BATH_AND_NORTH_EAST_SOMERSET: 32244
BEDFORD_(B): 45418
BIRMINGHAM_DISTRICT_(B): 5907
BLACKBURN_WITH_DARWEN_(B): 10165
BLAENAU_GWENT_-BLAENAU_GWENT: 10872
BOLTON_DISTRICT
(B): 4071
BOURNEMOUTH_(B): 52
BRACKNELL_FOREST_(B): 10938
BRADFORD_DISTRICT_(B): 25777
BRO_MORGANNWG_-THE_VALE_OF_GLAMORGAN: 33967
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE_COUNTY: 154118
CAERDYDD
-CARDIFF: 14951
CAERFFILI
-CAERPHILLY: 27738
CALDERDALE_DISTRICT
(B): 22317
CAMBRIDGESHIRE_COUNTY: 301330
CASNEWYDD_-NEWPORT: 21776
CASTELL-NEDD_PORT_TALBOT
-NEATH_PORT_TALBOT: 45186
CENTRAL_BEDFORDSHIRE: 71566
CHESHIRE_EAST
(B): 116635
CHESHIRE_WEST_AND_CHESTER_(B): 86880
CITY_OF_PETERBOROUGH_(B): 28285
CONWY_-CONWY: 115348
CORNWALL: 361335
COUNTY_DURHAM: 208425
COUNTY_OF_HEREFORDSHIRE: 217416
COVENTRY_DISTRICT
(B): 1626
CUMBRIA_COUNTY: 707179
DARLINGTON_(B): 16790
DERBYSHIRE_COUNTY: 243329
DEVON_COUNTY: 658375
DONCASTER_DISTRICT_(B): 48791
DORSET_COUNTY: 252208
EAST_RIDING_OF_YORKSHIRE: 249479
EAST_SUSSEX_COUNTY: 161509
ESSEX_COUNTY: 340974
GATESHEAD_DISTRICT_(B): 2288
GLOUCESTERSHIRE_COUNTY: 264647
GREATER_LONDON_AUTHORITY: 58
GWYNEDD_-GWYNEDD: 262237
HALTON
(B): 3611
HAMPSHIRE_COUNTY: 346006
HARTLEPOOL_(B): 5437
HERTFORDSHIRE_COUNTY: 138216
ISLE_OF_WIGHT: 39492
ISLES_OF_SCILLY: 2284
KENT_COUNTY: 334066
KIRKLEES_DISTRICT_(B): 20409
KNOWSLEY_DISTRICT_(B): 4319
LANCASHIRE_COUNTY: 268695
LEEDS_DISTRICT_(B): 30006
LEICESTERSHIRE_COUNTY: 195307
LINCOLNSHIRE_COUNTY: 598647
MANCHESTER_DISTRICT_(B): 654
MEDWAY_(B): 18739
MERTHYR_TUDFUL_-MERTHYR_TYDFIL: 11195
MIDDLESBROUGH
(B): 1123
MILTON_KEYNES_(B): 30483
NEWCASTLE_UPON_TYNE_DISTRICT_(B): 4156
NORFOLK_COUNTY: 540552
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE_COUNTY: 225481
NORTH_EAST_LINCOLNSHIRE_(B): 16116
NORTH_LINCOLNSHIRE_(B): 84195
NORTH_SOMERSET: 39080
NORTHUMBERLAND: 507818
NORTH_YORKSHIRE_COUNTY: 800716
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE_COUNTY: 181998
OLDHAM_DISTRICT_(B): 8827
OXFORDSHIRE_COUNTY: 256833
PEN-Y-BONT_AR_OGWR_-BRIDGEND: 25531
POWYS
-POWYS: 519545
REDCAR_AND_CLEVELAND
(B): 18740
RHONDDA_CYNON_TAF_-RHONDDA_CYNON_TAF: 42415
ROTHERHAM_DISTRICT
(B): 21991
RUTLAND: 39374
SEFTON_DISTRICT_(B): 8404
SHEFFIELD_DISTRICT_(B): 18331
SHROPSHIRE: 319727
SIR_BENFRO_-PEMBROKESHIRE: 165027
SIR_CEREDIGION
-CEREDIGION: 180586
SIR_DDINBYCH
-DENBIGHSHIRE: 84638
SIR_FYNWY
-MONMOUTHSHIRE: 88605
SIR_GAERFYRDDIN
-CARMARTHENSHIRE: 243894
SIR_Y_FFLINT
-FLINTSHIRE: 48943
SIR_YNYS_MON
-ISLE_OF_ANGLESEY: 74902
SLOUGH
(B): 718
SOLIHULL_DISTRICT_(B): 12313
SOMERSET_COUNTY: 349264
SOUTHEND-ON-SEA_(B): 817
SOUTH_GLOUCESTERSHIRE: 52927
STAFFORDSHIRE_COUNTY: 252130
ST_HELENS_DISTRICT_(B): 7253
STOCKTON-ON-TEES_(B): 17840
SUFFOLK_COUNTY: 379052
SUNDERLAND_DISTRICT_(B): 2583
SURREY_COUNTY: 111716
SWINDON_(B): 19359
TAMESIDE_DISTRICT_(B): 866
TELFORD_AND_WREKIN_(B): 29031
THE_CITY_OF_BRIGHTON_AND_HOVE_(B): 430
TORBAY_(B): 633
TOR-FAEN_-TORFAEN: 12624
TRAFFORD_DISTRICT
(B): 2952
WAKEFIELD_DISTRICT_(B): 22083
WARRINGTON_(B): 16339
WARWICKSHIRE_COUNTY: 186925
WEST_BERKSHIRE: 70416
WEST_SUSSEX_COUNTY: 191451
WIGAN_DISTRICT_(B): 1808
WILTSHIRE: 325533
WINDSOR_AND_MAIDENHEAD_(B): 16145
WOKINGHAM_(B): 17896
WORCESTERSHIRE_COUNTY: 165481
WRECSAM_-WREXHAM: 50377
YORK
(B): 24364
ZZ 11329 Parishes; Total area=14199250 hectares; Average/Parish=1253

(added later):

Hectare Totals for each Region:

Region              Total  Parished    %    Unparished  %
_______________ _________  _________  ____  _________  _____
East Scotland   1,829,536          0   0%   1,829,536  100%
Highland,Island 4,190,496          0   0%   4,190,496  100%
NE Scotland       654,387          0   0%     654,387  100%
SW Scotland     1,348,202          0   0%   1,348,202  100%
East England    1,957,808  1,846,210   94%    111,598    6%
East Midlands   1,577,508  1,484,136   94%     93,372    6%
London            159,469         58   0%     159,411  100%
NE England        864,605    785,200   91%     79,405    9%
NW England      1,494,539  1,248,658   84%    245,881   16%
SE England      1,935,958  1,760,956   91%    175,002    9%
SW England      2,438,091  2,357,941   97%     80,150    3%
West Midlands   1,299,810  1,190,556   92%    109,254    8%
Yorks., Humber  1,556,169  1,403,029   90%    153,140   10%
East Wales        778,164    778,164  100%          0    0%
West Wales      1,344,282  1,344,282  100%          0    0%
_______________ _________  _________  ____  _________  _____
               23,429,024 14,199,190 60.61% 9,229,834  39.39%

(added even later):

Hectare Totals for Population Cores:

Parishes Grouped by   Area                  Region              Total  Parished    %    Unparished  %
____________________  _____________________ _______________ _________  _________  ____  _________  ____
ABERDEEN_CITY         Unitary Authority     NE Scotland        20,561          0    0%     20,561  100%
ABERTAWE_-_SWANSEA    Unitary Authority     West Wales         42,089     42,089  100%          0    0%
BARNSLEY_DISTRICT_(B) Metropolitan District Yorks., Humber     32,906     18,454   56%     14,452   44%
BATH_AND_NE_SOMERSET  Unitary Authority     SW England         35,111     32,244   92%      2,867    8%
BEDFORD_(B)           Unitary Authority     East England       47,639     45,418   95%      2,221    5%
BIRMINGHAM_DISTRICT_( Metropolitan District West Midlands      26,778      5,907   22%     20,871   78%
BLACKBURN_WITH_DARWEN Unitary Authority     NW England         13,701     10,165   74%      3,536   26%
BLACKPOOL_(B)         Unitary Authority     NW England          4,315          0    0%      4,315  100%
BOLTON_DISTRICT_(B)   Metropolitan District NW England         13,979      4,071   29%      9,908   71%
BOURNEMOUTH_(B)       Unitary Authority     SW England          4,716         52    1%      4,664   99%
BRADFORD_DISTRICT_(B) Metropolitan District Yorks., Humber     36,641     25,777   70%     10,864   30%
BURY_DISTRICT_(B)     Metropolitan District NW England          9,946          0    0%      9,946  100%
CAERDYDD_-_CARDIFF    Unitary Authority     East Wales         14,951     14,951  100%          0    0%
CASNEWYDD_-_NEWPORT   Unitary Authority     East Wales         21,776     21,776  100%          0    0%
CASTELL-..PORT_TALBOT Unitary Authority     West Wales         45,186     45,186  100%          0    0%
CHESHIRE_CHESTER_(B)  Unitary Authority     NW England         96,729     86,880   90%      9,849   10%
CITY_OF_BRISTOL_(B)   Unitary Authority     SW England         23,533          0    0%     23,533  100%
CITY_OF_DERBY_(B)     Unitary Authority     East Midlands       7,803          0    0%      7,803  100%
CITY_OF_EDINBURGH     Unitary Authority     East Scotland      27,300          0    0%     27,300  100%
CITY_OF_K..HULL_(B)   Unitary Authority     Yorks., Humber      8,149          0    0%      8,149  100%
CITY_OF_LEICESTER_(B) Unitary Authority     East Midlands       7,334          0    0%      7,334  100%
CITY_OF_NOTTINGHAM_(  Unitary Authority     East Midlands       7,461          0    0%      7,461  100%
CITY_OF_PETERBOROUGH  Unitary Authority     East England       34,343     28,285   82%      6,058   18%
CITY_OF_PLYMOUTH_(B)  Unitary Authority     SW England          8,436          0    0%      8,436  100%
CITY_OF_PORTSMOUTH_(  Unitary Authority     SE England          6,014          0    0%      6,014  100%
CITY_OF_SOUTHAMPTON_( Unitary Authority     SE England          5,638          0    0%      5,638  100%
CITY_OF_STOKE..TRENT  Unitary Authority     West Midlands       9,344          0    0%      9,344  100%
CITY_OF_WOLVERHAMPTON Metropolitan District West Midlands       6,943          0    0%      6,943  100%
COVENTRY_DISTRICT_(B) Metropolitan District West Midlands       9,863      1,626   16%      8,237   84%
DARLINGTON_(B)        Unitary Authority     NE England         16,790     16,790  100%          0    0%
DONCASTER_DISTRICT_(  Metropolitan District Yorks., Humber     56,854     48,791   86%      8,063   14%
DUNDEE_CITY           Unitary Authority     East Scotland       6,222          0    0%      6,222  100%
FALKIRK               Unitary Authority     East Scotland      31,493          0    0%     31,493  100%
FIFE                  Unitary Authority     East Scotland     137,392          0    0%    137,392  100%
GATESHEAD_DISTRICT_(  Metropolitan District NE England         14,407      2,288   16%     12,119   84%
GLASGOW_CITY          Unitary Authority     SW Scotland        17,644          0    0%     17,644  100%
GREATER_LONDON...     County                London             15,9469        58    0%    159,411  100%
HARTLEPOOL_(B)        Unitary Authority     NE England          9,843      5,437   55%      4,406   45%
INVERCLYDE            Unitary Authority     SW Scotland        17,360          0    0%     17,360  100%
KIRKLEES_DISTRICT_(B) Metropolitan District Yorks., Humber     40,854     20,409   50%     20,445   50%
KNOWSLEY_DISTRICT_(B) Metropolitan District NW England          8,649      4,319   50%      4,330   50%
LEEDS_DISTRICT_(B)    Metropolitan District Yorks., Humber     55,170     30,006   54%     25,164   46%
LIVERPOOL_DISTRICT_(  Metropolitan District NW England         13,353          0    0%     13,353  100%
LUTON_(B)             Unitary Authority     East England        4,335          0    0%      4,335  100%
MANCHESTER_DISTRICT_( Metropolitan District NW England         11,564        654    6%     10,910   94%
MEDWAY_(B)            Unitary Authority     SE England         26,906     18,739   70%      8,167   30%
MIDDLESBROUGH_(B)     Unitary Authority     NE England          5,454      1,123   21%      4,331   79%
MILTON_KEYNES_(B)     Unitary Authority     SE England         30,483     30,483  100%          0    0%
NEWCASTLE_UPON_TYNE.. Metropolitan District NE England         11,511      4,156   36%      7,355   64%
OLDHAM_DISTRICT_(B)   Metropolitan District NW England         14,233      8,827   62%      5,406   38%
PEN-Y-BONT..BRIDGEND  Unitary Authority     West Wales         25,531     25,531  100%          0    0%
POOLE_(B)             Unitary Authority     SW England          7,471          0    0%      7,471  100%
READING_(B)           Unitary Authority     SE England          4,039          0    0%      4,039  100%
REDCAR_AND_CLEVELAND  Unitary Authority     NE England         25,388     18,740   74%      6,648   26%
ROCHDALE_DISTRICT_(B) Metropolitan District NW England         15,812          0    0%     15,812  100%
ROTHERHAM_DISTRICT_(  Metropolitan District Yorks., Humber     28,653     21,991   77%      6,662   23%
SALFORD_DISTRICT_(B)  Metropolitan District NW England          9,719          0    0%      9,719  100%
SHEFFIELD_DISTRICT_(  Metropolitan District Yorks., Humber     36,792     18,331   50%     18,461   50%
SLOUGH_(B)            Unitary Authority     SE England          3,253        718   22%      2,535   78%
SOLIHULL_DISTRICT_(B) Metropolitan District West Midlands      17,828     12,313   69%      5,515   31%
SOUTHEND-ON-SEA_(B)   Unitary Authority     East England        6,789        817   12%      5,972   88%
SOUTH_TYNESIDE...     Metropolitan District NE England          6,710          0    0%      6,710  100%
ST_HELENS_DISTRICT_(  Metropolitan District NW England         13,635      7,253   53%      6,382   47%
STIRLING              Unitary Authority     East Scotland     225,481          0    0%    225,481  100%
STOCKPORT_DISTRICT_(  Metropolitan District NW England         12,604          0    0%     12,604  100%
STOCKTON-ON-TEES_(B)  Unitary Authority     NE England         20,972     17,840   85%      3,132   15%
SUNDERLAND_DISTRICT_( Metropolitan District NE England         13,962      2,583   19%     11,379   81%
SWINDON_(B)           Unitary Authority     SW England         23,008     19,359   84%      3,649   16%
TAMESIDE_DISTRICT_(B) Metropolitan District NW England         10,315        866    8%      9,449   92%
TELFORD_AND_WREKIN_(  Unitary Authority     West Midlands      29,031     29,031  100%          0    0%
T..BRIGHTON_AND_HOVE  Unitary Authority     SE England          8,537        430    5%      8,107   95%
THURROCK_(B)          Unitary Authority     East England       18,431          0    0%     18,431  100%
TORBAY_(B)            Unitary Authority     SW England         11,946        633    5%     11,313   95%
TRAFFORD_DISTRICT_(B) Metropolitan District NW England         10,604      2,952   28%      7,652   72%
WAKEFIELD_DISTRICT_(  Metropolitan District Yorks., Humber     33,861     22,083   65%     11,778   35%
WALSALL_DISTRICT_(B)  Metropolitan District West Midlands      10,397          0    0%     10,397  100%
WARRINGTON_(B)        Unitary Authority     NW England         18,237     16,339   90%      1,898   10%
WIGAN_DISTRICT_(B)    Metropolitan District NW England         18,816      1,808   10%     17,008   90%
WINDSOR..MAIDENHEAD   Unitary Authority     SE England         19,842     16,145   81%      3,697   19%
WIRRAL_DISTRICT_(B)   Metropolitan District NW England         25,639          0    0%     25,639  100%
WOKINGHAM_(B)         Unitary Authority     SE England         17,896     17,896  100%          0    0%
WRECSAM_-_WREXHAM     Unitary Authority     East Wales         50,377     50,377  100%          0    0%
YORK_(B)              Unitary Authority     Yorks., Humber     27,200     24,364   90%      2,836   10%
____________________  _____________________ _______________ _________  _________  ____  _________  ____
                  83                                Totals: 2,127,947    903,361 42.45% 1,224,586 57.55%

Experience with Mapping

Posted by Amisha Singla on 23 August 2016 in English (English)

I decided to spend some time mapping on OpenStreetMap after starting at Mapbox to help build better mapping tools later. After having show and tells with Mapbox buddies, I started off with mapping my hometown. Though I had not very perfect memory of the places in my hometown as I am away from it from many years, but there were few places which I was sure about. As it is advised to add data with 100% accuracy only, therefore I tagged only the sure places in OSM. When I downloaded the data for my city Gandhidham in JOSM, to my surprise, the city was well traced by a remote mapper. Therefore I worked on adding known POIs. It was fun to look for my home from the satellite imagery and tag its address.

Next I traced roads in city called Raipur. It was like taking part in an enjoyable drawing task while keeping a few rules in mind. Adding intersections, junctions, classification of roads has a huge impact on the routing. So I did that quite carefully.

Later I moved on to tracing buildings in Baga Beach, Goa. While working on this task I found many buildings that were quite interesting. Also, there were many row houses present in that area. Therefore to do it efficiently, I tried exploring the shortcuts of JOSM i.e. Making a big building and splitting it into pieces.

The most fun and interesting part of mapping was Field Mapping. To execute this we went in a group and split into sub-groups for covering a bigger region to map. I teamed up with Srividya. We planned to collect details like building addresses, levels, amenities , trees, streetlights in the neighborhood area of Mapbox office.We used OSM Tracker, mobile application for field mapping. For mapping all the buildings and amenities, we assigned each building a text note with all its details and took few photographs of the same which later helped us to upload the information in JOSM. For mapping trees and streetlamps , the presets came in handy, as you just have to tap on the mobile screen, whenever you encounter any tree or streetlamp. But the problem being we could not find any preset for tree and streetlamp. Therefore Srividya and me found out this trick to encode things up. We used 'Shelter' preset for tree and 'Surveillance' preset for streetlamp. Field mapping helped to explore and understand the neighborhood better.

Overall, mapping the places was a wonderful experience. Looking forward to keep making more edits in OSM.

Learning Mapping

Posted by Amisha Singla on 23 August 2016 in English (English)

What is Mapping?

It is an operation which associates elements of one set with the one/more elements of another set. When we talk about mapping in OpenStreetMap, the similar concept is followed. In that, we associate the real life objects (Home, Parks, Schools, Roads, Water bodies) to 2D elements like node, ways and polygons. This means that we can traverse any place virtually by looking at the map and can a get a sense of directions, locality, etc.

What are the objects which can be mapped?

It can be mapping different amenities, POIs, roads, buildings, water bodies, turn restrictions, different transport networks, Trees, Street lamps, so on. This list is never ending as each of them has a special purpose of being added in the map. The more detailed it is, the more it helps in understanding the place geographically. Details

How do we Map?

Basically there are two steps involved to map a place:

  • Tracing - With the help of satellite imagery and tools like In-browser editor/JOSM, one is able to trace various buildings, roads, water bodies remotely. For learning JOSM, one can follow this blog. Tracing

  • Tagging - Once we are done with tracing, we can start adding particular details like name, type, etc depending what kind of entity ( node / way / polygon) it is. If one is well familiar with the details of the place, then it can be done remotely. The best example for it will be mapping your hometown. For the mapping the unfamiliar places, Field mapping comes in picture. It is a technique in which a person goes to the actual area and maps it. There are mobile applications like OSMTracker, Vespucci which are helpful for field Mapping. One can also use the field papers. To learn more about field mapping, one can follow this blog. Labelling

Location: Indiranagar 2nd Stage, Indiranagar, Bengaluru, Bangalore Urban, Karnataka, 560001, India

Progress of Navigation Mapping in Canada!

Posted by poornibadrinath on 23 August 2016 in English (English)

With an aim of making OpenStreetMap more navigable and accurate in routing, we started mapping turn restrictions and exit-destinations in Canada in its five important cities: Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Vancouver and Calgary. The tasks which spread over a month have been completed; we have finished adding and validating both turn restrictions and exit-destinations in the selected cities of Canada with the support from the OpenStreetMap community.

Summary of improvements

Mapping turn restrictions was flagged off on 21 of July with data team and the community working on adding missing turn restrictions and validating the ones that are present.

As the mapping progressed, workflow was getting updated every time the team had some doubts regarding how best to map a particularly different turn restriction that was detected. The questions we had were posted on the mapping ticket we used and the community got back to us almost immediately with clarifications to our questions. We completed both adding and validating turn restrictions in 14 days.

Exit-destination mapping started on August 11. For exit and destinations, a slightly different approach was followed, unlike how we mapped previously using only checkautopista2. Each highway was considered a separate task, which was integrated into tasking manager, with a specific link to checkautopista2 that loaded that particular highway that was selected using tasking manager.

Below is the full breakdown of how many turn restrictions and exit-destinations were mapped:

image

Status of existing data and Mapillary coverage

We could map extensively in Toronto because of great Mapillary coverage. Ottawa had us verifying the existing exit-destination tags rather than adding new ones because most of them were already mapped. 🎉 The community raced us in adding exit-destination tags in Vancouver! 🚀 Due to less Mapillary coverage, we couldn't map much in Montréal and Calgary. We wrapped up adding and validating exit-destinations in 9 days :)

Community support

Both the projects were met with an amazing response from the community. It was great to have you all working alongside us, helping us in adding missing data, calling out and correcting our errors, keep tabs on our edits, and clarifying doubts and questions, letting us make edits to previously added data. We thank everyone, especially Andrewpmk, Rps333, James2432, Bootprint, Puec, Fmarier, Scruss, for your support and guidance and hope the collaboration and involvement continues in all our future projects. We will continue navigation mapping in Canada, specifically in Montreal and Calgary once there is enough Mapillary or OpenStreetView coverage for us to add data and verify them.

Until then,

Cheers!

Mapbox Data Team :)

Spotting Cemeteries in Texas

Posted by mvexel on 23 August 2016 in English (English)

I am collaborating with agencies in Texas to update both OSM and Texas data. The pilot project deals with cemeteries. I received a file with almost 7000 cemetery locations. (Even if the idea that there are more people living today than have died thus far in human history turns out to be a myth, I think that is quite a lot!).

The first phase of this collaboration is to see which cemeteries in the Texas data actually exist. We will use MapRoulette for that. Simply go to the Cemetery challenge at maproulette.org and start looking at tasks.

If you see a cemetery in the aerial image, click 'skip' to go to the next one. If you don't see a cemetery, click 'False Positive'. If you are in doubt, click 'skip'.

How can you tell if there is a cemetery? Sometimes it is hard. Look for fine patterns defining the plots, and usually there will be a service road connecting the cemetery to the road network. Sometimes, in larger cemeteries, you may also see paths inside the cemetery. Finally, the marker may not be right on the cemetery, so look around a bit as well. Below are some examples of cemeteries and non-cemeteries.

Once we complete stage 1, we will turn to mapping all the cemeteries that are not yet in OSM yet!

cem

There is a cemetery here: fine regular pattern indicating plots, some paths.

cem

There is a cemetery here also.

cem

No cemetery here, just some grass.

Speed limits split ways

Posted by Gazgez on 22 August 2016 in English (English)

More speed limit changes in town centres. They need to be captured but I don't like breaking up the roads into little pieces. Subsequent searches just return a little bit of the original road.

# Wrapping up Google Summer of Code

Posted by kepta on 22 August 2016 in English (English)

3 months have passed and GSoC is about to an end. This small diary post showcases my contributions uptill now and it also lays down my next actions.

Major Contributions

Lane editor

The lane editor is my primary objective of the GSoC for this summer. These diary posts (1, 2) can be referred to get updated with the work.

Currently, most of the functional code is ready with 81 test cases testing most if not all edge cases possible. This code parses the osm data and gives a nice JSON output, which should then be supplied to the rendering.

Making iD modular

The iD contributors felt the need to start using the new ES6 module system back in April. I helped in the phase 1 and phase 2 of this process.

OSM hackday

I was a part of organizing team of this small hackday at Mapbox Bengaluru. More info

Links

My pull requests

My commits

Next Steps

Well GSoC 2016 is approaching an end, but not my contributions. There are lot of things pending in my bucket list. The first thing I would like to finish in the coming months would be the lane editor's UI and deploy it for the use of OSM community.

I am really proud to be one of the core contributors of iD and would really like to thank the community, my mentor Bryan Housel and Google for the awesome GSoC program.

An OpenStreetMap contributor, Kushan

Columbus V990 Cover : Handmade for fun

Posted by parambyte on 22 August 2016 in English (English)

I love the Columbus V990 as a tool for data gathering, not only for its long battery life (about 12-16 hours) and extreme ease of use, but also for its precision and price. Everything works. But what doesn't is its cover. I took the dimensions of the V990, and had a sleeve handcrafted. Its available for sale at Flipkart.com just look for StudioLove (one word).

I am hoping to create a small fund out of sale proceeds to help the community.

Columbus V990

These are hand made in Dharavi. Someone has nicely mapped the bylanes of Dharavi.

Location: Cooperative Housing Society, Dharavi, Sewri Koliwada, Greater Bombay, Maharashtra, 400019, India

OSM in Disaster Risk Management

Posted by Manjurul Islam on 21 August 2016 in English (English)

OSM data is very helpful for disaster risk management. This data is helpful for identification of vulnerable places ,way of passing, important key indicator etc. As the proper authority get the information they will take necessary steps to reduce the destruction of disaster.in this map we get the data about building condition, material, structure by research this information govt. /relevant authority will identify the vulnerable places and take necessary steps to reduce the vulnerability ,to reduce the damage of any kind of disaster . By using this data Bangladesh Red Crescent society or like this type of voluntary organization or Government organization like fire service , civil defense will plan their search & rescue operation. It will helpful for VCA(Vulnerable Capacity Assessment).

Manjurul Islam

Philippines Admin 4 Shapefile Data!!!!!!!!

Posted by MapMakinMeyers on 21 August 2016 in English (English)

A Suggestion to Fix Poor LSN in the UK

Posted by alexkemp on 20 August 2016 in English (English)

This is a research document; it is going to attempt to explain:—

  1. The fundamental basis on which Location, Search & Naming (LSN) facilities in OSM work
  2. Why those facilities fail for a substantial part (40%) of the UK
  3. How to fix it

You need to know that the writer has been mapping for only 5 months, and therefore only part-understands what he is talking about. One (possible) advantage is that his is a fresh eye, plus he has the ability to think for himself. As the writer enjoys stories, much of this will be presented in that form.

On Thursday 9 June 2016 I began to map outside of my home patch in Nottingham NG3 and met the Boundary marker which, since 1877, has marked the Boundary Line between the City of Nottingham and Gedling, and also between NG3 & NG4. I was now heading for Carlton, Gedling.

One feature that had been common throughout my NG3 mapping was that LSN had consistently failed with OSM. When I was mapping close to St Anns OSM said that I was in Thorneywood, and so on. By the time that I reached Carlton I'd gotten the basic map methods under my belt & could pay more attention to the condundrum of the fact that when I was working in Carlton (a Suburb) OSM said that I was in Bakersfield (at the time a Neighbourhood, but now a suburb), or even Thorneywood (another Neighbourhood).

Practical examples can focus the mind, and this post is typical. I placed the Diary arrow in Highfield Drive, Carlton, but the result was: “Location: Thorneywood, Sneinton, Nottingham, East Midlands, England, United Kingdom”, which isn't even the correct District. That was just embarassing.

Eventually it became clear that OSM was giving precedence to Neighbourhoods over Suburbs, which seems perverse, and I was deep into conversations with Will & Jerry (my nearest active, senior mappers) on how to handle it all. One of the results of those conversations was Bakersfield being changed from a Neighbourhood to a Suburb, which helped a bit, but that was only a minor part of the truth. A clue was given when a commenter (somewhere) said wrt LSN that “areas are important, not nodes”.

On 16 July 2016 I met, documented & mapped Nottingham's Unparished Areas.

How Location, Search & Naming (LSN) facilities in OSM work

It starts with admin_level=10 BoundaryLine areas. If they do not exist, then OSM will do the best that it can but, as documented above, often fails miserably. If they do exist then, as longe as yur speling is gud, then OSM will be able to find your search item and/or locate where you are and/or name that locality accurately.

Why Location, Search & Naming (LSN) facilities in OSM do NOT work

Whilst there are ~10,000 Civil Parishes (CPs) in England (which is what an admin_level=10 BoundaryLine area is documenting), a very substantial area of the country is unparished (referred to as an “Unparished Area”) (see all the “unnamed areas” in the Civil Parishes page). I've spoken to a very helpful & knowledgeable lady at the Local Government Boundary Commission (0330 500 1525) (hello Joe) who, to my dismay, confirmed that Unparished Areas are the Black Hole of the Boundary world. It was ‘dismay’ because many mappers have a cast of mind which insists that, if the authorities do not recognise it, then neither will they. That means that they do NOT want an admin_level=10 BoundaryLine area to exist for the Black Holes, and that means that LSN will never work for those areas. Oh dear.

Locally to me, the cities of Nottingham, Derby, Stoke-on-Trent and Leicester are Unparished (plus my home town of Hull), as also are Arnold and Carlton (one non-parish) plus Beeston. Notice that the last two are each named, even though they (supposedly) do not exist. St Anns and Thorneywood are both in the City of Nottingham whilst Carlton is within Arnold and Carlton. Thus, none of those 4 neighbourhoods/suburbs was at that time within an admin_level=10 BoundaryLine area, and my assertion is that is the reason that LSN features of OSM were inoperative for them.

The previous paragraphs are mixtures of anecdotal & written evidence, as I did not realise at the time why it was going wrong, but much of it did get documented due to my diary entries. The following is fully evidential:—

Nottinghamshire Civil Parishes - names for unnamed areas: the location arrow for that diary entry is placed in Slab Square, Nottingham. I moved the arrow a tad on 2 occasions when the BoundaryLine setup changed to discover the effect. These are the three location results + the BoundaryLine setup that applied at the time:

  • (Original)
    Location: Nottingham (Unparished), City of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands, England, United Kingdom
    ‣ admin_level=10 name=Nottingham (Unparished)
    ‣ admin_level=6 name=City of Nottingham
    ‣ admin_level=6 name=Nottinghamshire
  • admin_level=10 relation removed
    Location: Lace Market, St Ann's, Nottingham, East Midlands, England, United Kingdom
  • “City of Nottingham” relation changed to admin_level=10;8;6
    Location: Lace Market, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands, England, United Kingdom
    Searching for 'Nottingham' in OSM gives:
    City Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands, England, United Kingdom

Notes: The admin_level=10 relation was removed without consultation (as I understand it, this is considered by OSM to constitute abuse). Nevertheless, I took the opportunity to test out the effect of those changes, as shown above.

The Nottingham UA relation was changed by me to “admin_level=10;8;6” at 5am in the morning and returned back exactly as before shortly after completing the tests within the hour. That seemed a perfectly innocent action to me, but apparently not.

How to Fix It

All the evidence suggests that no admin_level=10 BoundaryLine area means no accurate LSN in OSM. The simplest fix to my mind is to enter a BoundaryLine for each Unparished area, but that is proving controversial. Even more controversial is my suggestion that, if folks want to discriminate between a CP and an Unparished area, then use designation=civil_parish for CPs & designation=non-civil_parish for Unparished areas. designation is an acceptable key for these folks, but both values are not, even though one non-standard value (and many others) has been promoted on a wiki for many years.

The main problem comes with Unitary Authorities (UAs). It is possible that, with a bit of tweaking, that the UA admin_level could be set to let it work. But maybe not.

Contra-Indications: Completing a recent Diary entry I set the pointer between Valley Road and Prospect Road. That location has an admin_level=10 area set. Saving the post, OSM said it was:—

Location: Thorneywood, Sneinton, Nottingham, East Midlands, England, United Kingdom

With Nominatim it seems, at times, that no-one actually knows how it all works. I've presented here my discoveries as I got my legs under OSM's table across the last 5 months, plus a simple method to fix it. My pessimistic belief is that no-one will be able to agree on a solution, and my ignorant, blundering efforts so far seem to have only provoked personal abuse and sleepless nights.

Parish Councils + Town Councils

The Ordnance Survey refer to a “Civil Parish (CP)” in their .shape files, but the Parliament Research Paper refers to:

  • Parish Council
  • Town Council
  • Neighbourhood Council
  • Community Council
  • Village Council
  • City Council

The above are the different styles that such bodies can freely adopt.

1894: Parish Councils Act : Parish and Town Councils first establishment.
1972: Local Government Act : source of modern legal foundation.

Powers: In theory Parish & Town Council powers are identical to those of a District. However, they mostly do not have the resources to do anything more than Leisure Services.

County Council: (admin_level=6) : Education, Highways
District Council (admin_level=8) : Bin collections, Cemetaries, Parks & Boundaries
Parish Council (admin_level=10) : (everything else)

Unparished Area (admin_level=??) : parish powers handled at the district level

Coda: The Scale of the Problem

Clearly, we need to know how much of the country is affected by this issue. I'll publish the full figures in a separate Diary entry, but here is the bottom line:

Parished: 11,329 Parishes; Average area/Parish=1,253 hectares; Total area=14,199,250 hectares (61%)
Unparished: 3,069 Parishes; Average area/Area=3,007 hectares; Total area=9,229,902 hectares (39%)

Mapper of the Month : Jorieke Vyncke (Belgium)

Posted by escada on 20 August 2016 in English (English)

Jorieke, a 28 years old Belgian, has spend a lot of time the past few years to support local OpenStreetMap communities all over the world. She worked on several projects in Africa, Europe and Asia to train people and to promote OpenStreetMap by local and international players.

Jorieke at the  Mapfugees in Duinkerke

Where and when did you discover OpenStreetMap?

I discovered OpenStreetMap at the end of 2010, "you will enjoy it", and YES ! I showed OpenStreetMap to my two brothers and together with them I mapped our village Wechelderzande Thanks to my student job as mailman, it was very easy, I knew half of the house numbers in the village by heart! Some time later, I discovered HOT, the Humanitarian OpenStreetmap Team, and Map Kibera. As social agoge, who had the ambition to work internationally and who was enormously interested in participation and spatiality, it simply had to interest me. My studies in 'Conflict and Development' gave me the opportunity to delve deeper in this type of mapping. I even got the chance to work for 6 weeks in Bangladesh for my master thesis. It gave me the possibility to talk with students and professors in architecture and spatial planning, the local OpenStreetMap community and a lot of people living in slums. And yes, it was them who really convinced me to use OpenStreetMap as a tool in humanitarian and development contexts. Precisely because they can put their neighborhood on the map themselves. After this project, everything went fast, a few months later I flew for the first time to Africa for the Eurosha project, in which HOT was one of the partners. And it never really stopped since then...

Do you use OpenStreetMap yourself?

Of course ! The apps OsmAnd and Maps.ME have "saved" me several times when I am abroad. You should see the faces of the taxi drivers in Bamako or Abidjan, when I can navigate them without problems to my destination. And when you show them the apps, their surprise is complete. "OpenStreetMap for taxi drivers", would make a nice little project :-) Those apps also give me confidence when I walk around in an unknown neighborhood, because now you know where you are and where you want to go.

Besides this personal use, I also often use OpenStreetMap for my work. For example, during my last project in Côte d'Ivoire, the complete logistic planning was based on OpenStreetMap. Check out one of the maps I made with Umap for this purpose.

I was very gratefull for HOT's Ebola activation! The western part of the Côte d'Ivoire is about perfect! With a few corrections by people that knew the region very well, we got the logistics running smoothly. Other parts of the country were harder, driving around for 40 kilometers to get in that particular village, was not uncommon.

GisDay 2015 met OpenStreetMap Mali

How and where do you map?

Most of the time I map were I am or were I have been. This means a lot in Belgium, but also in places where I had worked or had spend a vacation. Most of the time, I map the basics: roads, buildings, residential areas or points of interests. I leave more complex stuff such as relations or boundaries to other mappers. [JOSM](josm.openstreetmap.de) is indispensable for me. The main reason is that this editor does not require a constant internet connection! One can download data and aerial images, work for a few hours without network and electricity, and upload the data afterwards. This comes in handy when you are somewhere remotely in Africa! I am also a fan of less popular projects on the Tasking Manager. During a sudden natural disaster, a lot of attention goes to that one area at that particular moment, but there are a lot of countries with a forgotten crisis, such as Tchad, Mali or [South Sudan(http://www.openstreetmap.org/relation/1656678). There is a gigantic need for maps in those countries as well.

What is your largest accomplishment as a mapper?

Bangui! I lived and worked there for 3 months, participating in the Eurosha project at the end of 2012. Bangui is the capital of the Central African Republic (CAR). Before my stay, Bangui was hardly noticeable on the map. When I had to leave the country, it was there, and the data could be used by humanitarian organisations in times of crisis. The adrenaline was pumping through my body when we got a phone call in Cameroon from UN OCHA on the day of the coup when the whole city was looted, to ask whether we could help them. Of course we could!!!

At this moment there is a map of Bangui, which includes all health facilities and also in other parts of the country the map is improving via HOT remote mapping projects.

I am also very proud of the week I spend in Lubumbashi with Medecins Sans Frontiers (MSF): https://hotosm.org/updates/2014-04-01_a_week_in_lubumbashi_drc . Although I did not map a lot myself during that period, I instructed people to map for me :-) At the end of the week, around 15 students were walking around to collect data and we got tremendous help from remote mappers. After 4 days more than 60 people from around the world helped us. This synergy with Ivan Gayton of MSF, myself and the students in the field and the remote mappers, was the first seed from which the Missing Maps projects was born a few months later.

Data collection in Bangui

What is your motivation to map?

The community and the enormous passion of the people, which shows in small things. Some examples: Someone visiting a meetup with a bus that takes him 30 minutes more, simply because he had not mapped that particular route yet. The sparkle in someone's eye when her first edit appears on the map. The fire in the email discussions on the mailing lists, ...

But also how all this chaos, somehow coordinates to the result we see today on OpenStreetMap. A database build by ordinary people, but feeding economic development, and a key stone in some humanitarian projects.

OpenStreetMap is for me a great example of the inspiring "commons based economy" of Michel Bauwens.

Besides mapping, do you do other OpenStreetMap related tasks?

Since the spring of 2015, I am in the board of HOT. Besides that, I spend quite some time to answer all kinds of emails and to bring the right people in contact with one another. From time to time I do some translations, update the wiki and make a post on osm.be . I also speak on conferences, co-organise meetups and mapathons. At this moment I am busy with the organisation of the HOTsummit and the State of the Map conference.

To conclude, is there anything else you want to mention?

Do not be afraid, just make that first edit. Everybody can participate in OpenStreetMap, I am the living proof of that!

Defragging Fragged Streets

Posted by alexkemp on 20 August 2016 in English (English)

There has been an increased alertness to my changeset comments in recent weeks. I thought it reasonable, since I'm half-inventing words, to explain at greater length what on earth was going on.

I started mapping in March by entering house numbers & names onto the map & have continued doing that most days since. I've been using terracer within JOSM to do it, including associatedStreet relations for each house, something that terracer made easy. The team that maintain JOSM have been working hard to allow it to work under Java-8 (the dependency was previously on Java-7); however, many plugins (including terracer) are unmaintained and, as the chief developer informed me, they do not bother to check what effect their changes have upon any plugin.

Shortly after I started, version-32158 started crashing JOSM when certain options were selected and, shortly after, it was NOT possible to create a relation with terracer under any circumstances. That circumstance continues today, using the current-stable JOSM-10786 (terracer-32699).

This is how to create a new associatedStreet relation:

  1. Select your street ways + all houses
  2. From the menu, choose menu:Presets | Relations | Associated Street
  3. From the dialog, Enter the name of the street
  4. Press “New relation”
  5. (house members should get a ‘house’ role, whilst the street ways get a ‘street’ role)

That was fine, and it worked, but I only knew how to create a new relation, and not how to add new members to an existing relation. Consequently, and especially with big roads, the number of relations for each road began to grow. I was fragging (fragmenting) the street relations.

Eventually, I discovered how to add new houses to an existing associatedStreet relation. This is how you do it:

  1. Select the houses and/or street(s) to add to an existing same-street relation
  2. Switch on the Relations window (menu:Windows | Relations) or (alt-shift-R)
  3. Select the associatedStreet relation to add to and click on ‘Edit’
  4. The houses, etc. that you selected outside of the Relation Editor are now selected in the RHS window; click on the button to add them to the relation
  5. (optional) sort the relation
  6. Click to save

I hadn't done it deliberately but, since it was me that had fragmented so many street relations, It seemed only reasonable that it should be me that defragged them. Hence the changesets. I notified them one at a time so that, if something went horribly wrong, it would be easy to revert any individual street.

Location: Thorneywood, Sneinton, Nottingham, East Midlands, England, United Kingdom

Project Map Pinedale - Completion

Posted by MRPockets on 19 August 2016 in English (English)

Project Complete

I have finally gotten around to finishing up the bits & pieces of Pinedale proper that I am aware were still unmapped (according to the goals I gave myself for this project). I believe now that I have succeeded in my stated goals!

Mapping Still Needed

Pinedale proper is extensively mapped (though of course there is much that could be added: sidewalks, more POIs, etc) but the outlying areas as still mostly unmapped (excepting roads). While I will continue to map the area as I can & have a desire to do so, I will not be putting much concentrated effort into it. If there are any other mappers in this area, I invite you to put some work into the areas that are still lacking.

Location: West Pine Street, Pinedale, Sublette County, Wyoming, 82941, United States of America

Weekly roundup of edits

Posted by nammala on 19 August 2016 in English (English)

Here are a few observations from the OpenStreetMap edits between 8 August - 19 August. Most of these helped us understand common mapping issues faced by the new mappers.

  • Added untagged nodes 1, 2. These were reverted by the community.
  • Added nodes with numbers as names 1. Reverted by community.
  • Bad imports of data 1. Reverted by commuinty.
  • Deleted waterway=riverbank , natural=water tags and stream 1, 2, 3 respectively. Asked for clarification.
  • Deleted building 1. Asked for clarification.
  • Deleted highway=service roads inside the park 1. Asked for clarification.

It is always good to let the user know of such issues and encourage them to do active and quality contributions to OpenStreetMap.

Looking forward to another roundup next week. Happy Mapping.

Free Tiles and a Story of Noncommercial Death Spiral

Posted by siberiano on 19 August 2016 in English (English)

OpenStreetMap has had a spike in tiles usage and, as I understand, the decision among those in charge was to limit tiles usage. Ilya Zverev has written a good summary on the decision in his blog: (use Google Translate) http://shtosm.ru/all/dlya-kogo-tayly/ His main point is that OSM is not liable to provide tiles to anyone but the mappers.

OSM owes you nothing, to put it shortly. And it's not a commercial provider to do it for a reasonable rate. That's perfectly true. Except that this case is another step to a death spiral and makes the project end come closer.

I saw exactly this happen in an amateur community network that I used. Its approach was exactly the same and it led to an eventual death of the project. OSM resembles it in many details, decisions and explanations. The community network also was very righteous in its statements.

Noncommercial provider

(I have to clarify the state of the internet providers, to make it clear. You may omit this paragraph.) In 1999, the internet providers in the city consisted almost entirely of (audio) dial-up, that is 56Kbit top speed. The phone network was state-owned, it tried hard to jump on the DSL wagon, but only upgraded its stations by 2004. Unlimited Ethernet or DSL appeared only in 2006-7.

So, in 1997, some 5 guys in a big condo near me, tired of modem speed, connected their computers with coaxial cables and Ethernet cards to make a local network. They were very enthusiastic and made all sorts of things: bought 56K modem and an unlimited plan, installed 24/7 servers, made an internal website with lots of information, and so on. In 2000, they organized consumer cooperative and finally bought in bulk a 1Mbit Ethernet line. By 2001 there were about a 100 users, and I was in 110s when I joined it in October or November.

The service was just fantastic compared to what was available: $4..5 per month, $0.06 per megabyte of data. Overall, I paid around $20..25 per month. With nobody wanting to pay a lot, the 1 Megabit connection to the outer world was always available. Inside the network, everything was free, we had 10..100 Megabits connections and shared lots of files.

There was another similar network in neighbor area, which eventually occupied the same area as ours, and in 2003 that network became a commercial provider.

That was the tipping point. From that moment that commercial network tried harder and harder to implement all the newest things, and our non commercial network invested in cables and hardware but had no means to improve the services and organization. In 2007 I finally left it because the commercial guys offered unlimited data plans, payment via bank card or payment terminals in shops, guaranteed support, etc.

Meanwhile our noncommercial network, had same old tools from 2002. For instance, to buy data traffic, we had to print a bill, go pay it in a bank, then input the numbers in an old form in the internal website, which looked the same as in 1997. Then the admin would just add data bytes to your account in the gateway. To open the gateway (it was closed to prevent your money drain), there was another web form, and no tools to simplify the workflow.

By 2007 when I left, the network had more than a 1000 users, but in mid-2000s many already started switching to commercial providers.

Looking back, in 2001, the noncom network offered the best service in the city. By 2007, step by step, the commercialized networks upgraded their services, meanwhile every time the consumer cooperative made righteous explanations and did next to no improvements.

That's no secret: in every commercial company someone is motivated to shut up and work better and harder. He either earns big money on this, or at least guarantees the company survival. In noncommercial organization, everybody wins a little bit, but nobody is incentivised this much to make big enough an effort.

Back to OSM

What are the reasons for users to switch to OSM now?

  1. free data for GIS work (but in the richer countries, data quality is high enough that, if tomorrow OSM dies, we'll be fine with old planet files)
  2. easy map to add to a website or an app? no
  3. routing? no
  4. addresses or geocoding? no, addresses seem to be scarse and incomplete with exception to countries like the Netherlands
  5. tiles?

A tile layer is too big a commodity to be offered for free, but the point is that the less gateways to OSM exist, the less reasons are for it to exist at all.

In 2006 our noncommercial network rejected the idea of unlimited plans as economically unsound. In reality, unlimited plans are very economically sound. The management insisted that free data traffic would be abused. Same way, OSM insists it's unsound to offer tiles for free.

I'm no expert to give advices. Limiting the tile usage might be necessary right now. My point is that this is another step in a way from the users and the world, which leads to project not needed by anyone. Ask yourself, why WILL one use OSM? (will, not should)

Location: SHCH District (Щ), Советский район, Novosibirsk, городской округ Новосибирск, Novosibirsk Oblast, Siberian Federal District, 630000, Russian Federation

SciGRID project conference on power grid modelling (using OSM data)

Posted by widedangel on 19 August 2016 in English (English)

The SciGRID power network model, written in Python, is mainly based on the "power" relations data available in openstreetmap.org under ODbL. This data constitutes the skeleton of the SciGRID model.

We are pleased to announce the SciGRID International Conference on Power Grid Modelling and the calls for abstracts and papers. The conference aims at presenting state of the art research on power grids and energy system modelling by bringing together experts from the power network and the energy system modelling communities. The goal is to share knowledge and help identify the common problems encountered in research, industry, and software development topics.

For more information you can contact me or visit www.scigrid.de

It sounds official: OSM Standard style tiles are for mappers

Posted by BushmanK on 19 August 2016 in English (English)

When someone tries to compare OSM.org and any cartographic web service (usually, Google) it is hard to make people trust you when you telling them it's nothing more than technical website mainly intended for internal use by mappers. Same problem applies to OSM Standard (aka Mapnik) style. Finally, there is something more or less official to show them as a proof.

Andy Allan just gave this reply on question about expanding tile distribution infrastructure. (Full message text with added emphasis.)

We should be clear here - we have more than enough capacity to handle all the traffic generated by our mappers, editing software and every website run by the OSMF, local chapters and local mapping groups. Several times over.

We've always allowed other people to use our spare capacity on the tileservers, but recently it's got completely out of hand. Most of the use of our tileservers has become developers looking for free maps, nothing to do with the rest of the project. Often these are commercial companies who are using our tileservers and selling their apps. Subsidising commercial companies isn't the best use of community donations and volunteer sysadmin time, when there are many alternative services (such as those run by CartoDB, Stamen, etc) that provide zero-cost map layers based on OSM data anyway.

We do have plans to scale the tile infrastructure later in the year (cascading an old database server), in addition to the current process making sure that our OSMF tileservers are being mainly used for OpenStreetMap related projects.

I just want to keep it here to be able to quote it for any stubborn people, insisting on their own view of OSM infrastructure functions.

Calverton Floral Abundance

Posted by alexkemp on 19 August 2016 in English (English)

Calverton resplendent

(that's a mixture of English & French lavender in the foreground)

One of the glories of English gardens is the astonishing abundance of flowers. Calverton Avenue was built by Gedling Pit in 1954 to provide housing for 80 employees. One of those houses today has the most beautiful and astonishing variety of flowers blooming under the August sun. The lady of the house was kind enough to allow me to photograph some of them. Here is a closer shot:—

blooming lovely

I asked what flowers she had in the borders. Here are the ones that I managed to write down:—

  • Lobelias
  • Ox-Eye Daisies
  • Asters
  • Lupins
  • Marigolds
  • Calendula
  • Nasturtiums
  • Cosmos
  • Petunias
  • Begonias

The whole of the rear of the house had been crafted into multi-level gardening & pond heaven. My grateful thanks for allowing me to photograph the results of so many years' hard work.

Location: Thorneywood, Sneinton, Nottingham, East Midlands, England, United Kingdom

Tweety Pie has moved to Valley Road

Posted by alexkemp on 17 August 2016 in English (English)

I was going stir-crazy & got back onto the road to do some field-work in Valley Road, only to discover this:

tweety pie in Valley Rd

(you may be more mature than me, but I found it funny; as a child I liked Warnor Bros cartoons way more than Disney)

I'm sorry to have to say that I found the 1930s detached & semi-detached houses in Valley Road & Prospect Road deeply boring. However, the residents were most helpful in helping me stem off dehydration by providing water + salt on request (both roads are on a hill & it was hot hot hot).

There were two interesting houses in Prospect Drive. This house board was made in Kenya:—

Kenya

...and I've always got a soft-spot for plaster dolls:

plaster dolls

Location: Thorneywood, Sneinton, Nottingham, East Midlands, England, United Kingdom
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